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Oregon Auto Driving Laws

Violations and License Suspensions

If you get a ticket for violating nearly any rule of the road or driver licensing, registration or vehicle equipment laws, the offense is called a traffic violation.

Under Oregon driving law, if you choose to forfeit bail or if a judge convicts you, you may be required to pay a fine. If you forfeit the bail, it is considered a conviction on your driving record for a violation of Oregon Traffic Laws.

Traffic Crimes

Some Oregon traffic law offenses are so serious that if you break these laws you are charged with traffic crimes.

Under Oregon driving law, you do not need to be driving on a public highway to be charged with these offenses. You also may be charged in areas or premises open to the general public for use of motor vehicles, such as parking lots on either public or private property. You also may be charged with these offenses in some off-road areas.

Driving while under the influence of intoxicants, failure to perform the duties of a driver, reckless driving, fleeing or trying to elude a police officer, and some driving while suspended or revoked charges, are traffic crimes.

Driver Improvement Program

Under Oregon driving law, if you commit an offense of Oregon traffic laws, you are subject to certain procedures and penalties aimed at improving your driving ability and keeping only safe drivers on the roads.

These procedures and penalties are the minimum actions that will be taken. You may face additional legal sanctions, depending upon the severity of the traffic offense for which you are convicted.

Here's what happens to drivers under 18

Under Oregon driving law, if you have two convictions, or two accidents, or a combination of one and one accident, DMV will restrict your driving privileges for three months to drive only to and from work or when required for your job. During the three-month restriction, you may not drive with passengers except your parent, stepparent or

These restrictions are in addition to the restrictions placed on a driver in the first year of a provisional license. In accordance with Oregon driving law, a conviction for violation of these restrictions could result in a suspension or revocation of your driving privileges.

If you get another conviction or accident, DMV will suspend your driving privileges for one year, even if you turn 18 years of age during the suspension period.

Here's what happens to drivers over 18

In accordance with Oregon driving law, if you have three convictions, or three accidents, or a combination that equals three, in an 18-month period, DMV will restrict your driving privileges for thirty days.

The restriction will not allow you drive between 12 midnight and 5 a.m., unless driving to and from work or when required for your

Under Oregon driving law, if you have four convictions or four accidents, or a combination that totals four, in a 24-month period, DMV will suspend your driving privileges for thirty days.

Habitual Traffic Offenders

DMV will revoke your driving privileges for five years if you are convicted of three or more of the following offenses of Oregon driving law within a five year period:

  • Any degree of murder, manslaughter, criminally negligent homicide, assault, recklessly endangering another person, menacing or criminal mischief resulting from the operation of a motor vehicle.
  • Driving while under the influence of intoxicants.
  • Driving while your driving privileges are suspended or revoked (felony and misdemeanor charges only).
  • Reckless driving.
  • Failure to perform the duties of a driver after a collision.
  • Fleeing or attempting to elude a police officer.

Under Oregon driving law, DMV will also revoke your driving privileges as an habitual traffic offender if you are convicted of 20 or more violations of Oregon traffic laws within five years.

Violations of Oregon traffic laws such as driving while suspended or revoked, speeding, fail to yield right of way or running red lights are some examples of convictions of Oregon driving law that can be counted to classify you as an habitual traffic offender.

Suspensions and Revocations

Under Oregon driving law, if a judge suspends your driving privileges, you may get a suspension order in court. The court will confiscate your driver license and return it to DMV.

If DMV suspends your driving privileges, DMV will send a notice of suspension to the address on your driving record. If you have a license in your possession, you must return it to a DMV office when the suspension begins.

After the suspension or revocation begins, you may not drive any motor vehicle on highways or premises open to the public.

Under Oregon driving law, some convictions for violations of Oregon traffic laws are so serious that your driving privileges are revoked for eight years or longer.

Reinstatement Fees

Under Oregon driving law, there is a $75 reinstatement fee to restore driving privileges that have been revoked or suspended for violations of Oregon traffic laws.

For More Information

Oregon Department of Transportation

(Source: StateDrivingLaw.com)


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