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Minnesota Auto Driving Laws

Your Driving Privileges: How to Protect Them

Your driving record shows if you have violated a Minnesota driving law or license requirement. The record is kept by the Minnesota Department of Public Safety.

Severe or repeated violations of Minnesota traffic laws may result in a loss of driving privilege or a restriction on where, when, and what types of vehicle you may drive.

Driving in Minnesota is a privilege. This privilege can be taken away if you abuse it.

License Suspension, Revocation, or Cancellation

You are responsible for obeying all Minnesota traffic laws and driver's license laws. If you are arrested for breaking a traffic or driver's license law and convicted, you may lose your license. This is in addition to any other punishment given to you by the court.

Convictions in Minnesota or other states are entered on your driving record.

Suspension

In accordance with Minnesota driving law, your driving license may be suspended if:

  • You are charged with a Minnesota driving law traffic violation for which suspension of your license is required upon conviction.
  • Your driving record shows that you have repeatedly violated Minnesota traffic laws.
  • You have been convicted in court for a violation that contributed to or caused a traffic crash that resulted in the death or personal injury of another or caused serious property damage.
  • You have allowed your license to be used for fraud or an illegal action or have yourself used your license for fraud or an illegal action. It is illegal for anyone else to use your license or permit or for you to alter your license.
  • You commit a traffic offense in another state that would be grounds for suspension in this state.
  • You are judged in court to be legally unfit to drive a motor vehicle.
  • You fail to report a medical condition that would have resulted in cancellation of driving privileges.
  • You fail to stop for a school bus with its stop arm extended and its red lights flashing within five years of a prior conviction for violation of that law.
  • You have a fake or altered license.
  • You made a fraudulent application for a license or identification card.
  • You took any part of the driver's license examination for someone else or had someone take the exam for you.
  • You falsely identify yourself to a police officer.
  • You fail to appear in court or pay a fine on a motor vehicle related Minnesota driving law violation when required to do so.
  • You have been convicted of a misdemeanor for a violation of Minnesota driving law traffic regulations.
  • You fail to pay court-ordered child support.
  • You use or allow someone to use a license, permit, or identification card to buy tobacco products for someone who is under the age of 18.
  • You use or allow someone to use a license, permit, or identification card to buy alcohol for someone who is under the age of 21.
  • You are under age 21 and the court determines that you drove a motor vehicle while consuming or after consuming alcohol.

After the period of suspension has ended, Minnesota driving law stipulates that your driving privilege may be reinstated. This will occur only if all the requirements for reinstatement of your license are met. (This includes payment of the reinstatement fee.)

If your license expired during the suspension period, or your name or address changed, you also must apply for a new license and pay the appropriate fee.

Revocation

In accordance with Minnesota driving law, your driver's license may be revoked if:

  • You refuse to take a test to determine if you are under the influence of alcohol or a controlled substance or you fail the test.
  • You are convicted of manslaughter or any other criminal action in which you were driving a motor vehicle.
  • You are convicted of driving a motor vehicle while under the influence of drugs or alcohol.
  • You are convicted of a felony in which you used a motor vehicle.
  • You are convicted of fleeing a police officer.
  • You are convicted of failing to stop, identify yourself, and render aid when involved in a motor vehicle crash, which you are required to do by Minnesota driving law. Convictions of this kind usually involve traffic crashes that result in death or personal injury to others.
  • You are convicted of lying under oath. This includes:
    • Signing any legal document that contains false information involving laws that regulate ownership or operation of a motor vehicle.
    • Making a false statement to the Department of Public Safety or its agents about such information.
  • You plead guilty or forfeit bail for three violations of Minnesota traffic laws within a single year of any Minnesota driving law or ordinance that requires a jail sentence upon conviction.
  • You have been convicted of an offense committed in another state that would be grounds for revoking your license if you were convicted in this state.
  • You are convicted of a misdemeanor for driving a motor vehicle and knew beforehand that the owner of the vehicle you were driving does not have no-fault car insurance.
  • You own a vehicle without no-fault insurance and are found to have driven it or allowed others to drive it with full knowledge that the vehicle was not insured.
  • You are convicted of a gross misdemeanor for violating a school bus stop arm.
  • You are convicted of selling or possessing a controlled substance while operating a motor vehicle.

Minnesota driving law stipulates that after the period of revocation has ended, your driving privilege may be reinstated. This is only if all the requirements for reinstatement of your license are met. This includes payment of the reinstatement fee and passing the appropriate exams.

You must show proper identification when required to take a knowledge test or road test. You must apply for a new license after all your testing requirements are met.

Limited License

Under some circumstances of Minnesota driving law, a limited license may be issued to a person whose driving privileges are revoked or suspended for violation of Minnesota traffic laws when all appropriate requirements have been met. There may be a mandatory waiting period before the work permit will be issued.

A limited license is restricted to:

  • The driver's livelihood or attendance at chemical dependency treatment or counseling.
  • A homemaker to provide family service for the person's dependent child or other dependent living in the same household as the driver for medical, educational, or nutritional needs.
  • A student enrolled in a post- secondary institute, including a college, university, or technical college.

Cancellation

Your license may be canceled under Minnesota driving law if you do not have a legal right to the driver's license you were issued. This might be for any of the following reasons:

  • You suffered a mental or physical disability and this disability made you incapable of driving a motor vehicle safely.
  • You did not pass tests legally requested by the Department of Public Safety to determine your ability to drive safely.
  • You gave false or misleading information on your license application.
  • You committed a crime for which cancellation of your license was a legal punishment.
  • You do not qualify for a driver's license under Minnesota driving law.

For More Information

Minnesota Department of Transportation

(Source: StateDrivingLaw.com)


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